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National Arthritis Week 2014 - a full 7 days of fundraising activities and awareness events across the UK - has just come to a close, with men, women, and children up and down the country helping to make a difference in the lives of the estimated 10 million arthritis sufferers in Britain.

From children going to school in orange outfits - the colour of the Arthritis Research UK charity - to exhausting 5 kilometre walks through Newcastle, we've succeeded in raising money to fund new research - such as the concept of stem cell injection that's taking the United States by storm - and improving awareness of the condition on a nationwide scale.

Donation Box For National Arthritis Week 2014

There are two types of arthritis - osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis - that can cause swelling, restricted mobility, and severe pain in sufferers.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of the condition in the UK, with around 8 million of us affected. Rheumatoid arthritis is less common, but the pain is frequently compared to that of childbirth.

Sadly, there is no known cure for either type of arthritis, and currently there are only a few ways to adequately manage the pain, including anti inflammatory drugs for rheumatoid arthritis, and rest for osteoarthritis, which is why many sufferers use wheelchairs or have stairlifts installed in the home to take the pressure off the joints.

Despite there not yet being more effective forms of treatment, or a definite cure, charities and research centres around the world are continuing to find new avenues that are worth exploring, and discovering new risk factors that could help prepare the public for managing the condition.

In fact, some of the most beneficial research in recent years has come from the University of Nottingham. Nottingham University's research centre was honoured during the 2014 National Arthritis Week, with the Arthritis Research UK charity announcing that it would continue to fund the centre for another 5 years following breakthroughs relating to specific pain mechanisms.

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